Volume 4, Issue 1, June 2018, Page: 41-44
Teaching Lean Manufacturing in Educational Field Through LBD: A Case Study in an Engineering School
Meddaoui Anwar, Department of Industrial Engineering, Ecole Nationale Superieur d’Arts et Metiers, University Hassan II, Casablanca, Morocco
Hachmoud Sami, Department of Information Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University Hassan I, Settat, Morocco
Allali Hakim, Department of Information Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University Hassan I, Settat, Morocco
Received: Apr. 30, 2018;       Accepted: May 28, 2018;       Published: Jun. 28, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijvetr.20180401.16      View  593      Downloads  67
Abstract
Classical learning in an engineering educational environment presents problems for most of students to understand in practice some engineering methodologies, especially lean manufacturing. Lean is a philosophy initiated by Toyota to eliminate waste, organize workplace and procedures to enhance productivity. The current paper compares efficiency between classical teaching method and learning by doing pedagogic process. The purpose is to propose a new manufacturing educational model based on previous works and return of experiments. A case study is established to support proposed model by measuring training efficiency and students’ creativity compared to classical educational tools. Future researches could use the proposed model in other educational fields.
Keywords
Lean Manufacturing, Learning by Doing (LBD), Efficiency of Teaching, Teaching Simulation
To cite this article
Meddaoui Anwar, Hachmoud Sami, Allali Hakim, Teaching Lean Manufacturing in Educational Field Through LBD: A Case Study in an Engineering School, International Journal of Vocational Education and Training Research. Vol. 4, No. 1, 2018, pp. 41-44. doi: 10.11648/j.ijvetr.20180401.16
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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